There are presently slightly under 1.5 billion PCs connected to the Internet, and just over 1 billion net-enabled phones. Mike Nelson (former director of Internet Technology at IBM, the former director of Technology Policy with the FCC, and a professor at Georgetown’s Communications, Culture & Technology program) estimates that as we move from an “internet of PCs” to an Internet of Things, that there will be roughly 100 billion net-enabled devices within the next 5-10 years.

More on this in Hammersmith’s upcoming Networked Objects and The Internet of Things report.

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According to the Gartner Group, “By year end 2012, physical sensors will create 20% of non-video internet traffic … The extent and diversity of real-time environmental sensing is growing rapidly as our ability to act on and interpret the growing volumes of data to capture valuable information increases.”

Most of the discussion around technology and real estate has focused on energy-efficiency or property management applications. These uses of technology are essentially invisible to the residents of a space.

This research report from Hammersmith explores how pioneering projects are incorporating technology to address lifestyle issues and enhance the experience of being in a space for residents.

While most of these examples are drawn from hospitality and senior housing sectors, it is critical to remember that each of these are critical vectors for disseminating innovations: each hotel room exposes hundreds of guests per year to the technologies, and senior housing can demonstrate the value of certain innovations to the extended family. In each case, the asset class serves as viral marketing.

Let me know what you think:

http://thehammersmithgroup.com/images/reports/tech.pdf